Jon Ossoff Wins Georgia's Democratic Senate Primary


American Politician Jon Ossoff wins Georgia's Democratic Senate primary:


American Politician Jon Ossoff won the Georgia Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate, Associated Press projects.

Counting continued Wednesday throughout Georgia, initially on Tuesday, plagued by long lines and problems with voting machines.

Jon Ossoff had 50.5% of the vote, up from 979% in the previous report. Georgia's electoral law requires a majority vote to secure a candidate's initial nomination.

Jon Ossoff was far ahead of the other six Democratic candidates. He is a Republican senator in November. Will face David Perdy.

Georgia's Democratic Senate primary precincts report:



After the vote count was suspended on Wednesday, Osaf "promised to fight to ensure every single vote count."

"Thousands of votes remain to be counted. So it's not time to talk about the results until these votes are counted," he said in a statement early Wednesday.

While most of the election was conducted by mail, personal voting on Tuesday resulted in major logistical problems and long lines across the state, raising concerns about preparations for election day in November.

The former mayor of Columbus, Ga, Teresa Tomlinson brought Osaf to second place, and she closely followed Georgia Lieutenant Governor candidate Sara Riggs Amico.

If Jon Ossoff cannot get more than 50% of the vote, he and the runner-up will hold a run-off election on August 11.

Tomlinson said in a statement on Wednesday that "for the third time in his political career, John Osaf has failed to break the 50% required to avoid run foot."

"Georgian voters know we need a strong candidate to deal with David Perdu, and although John is well-known, most voters reject him again," he added, although it remains to be seen whether Jon Ossoff will get the most votes.

In a statement from Amico's campaign, he stressed the need to count additional ballots before proceeding.

Amico said, 'Thousands of ballots are missing for every Georgian voter when the candidate unilaterally falls on deaf ears to declare the results of this contest'.

Among the seven Democrats running for primary, including Maya Dillard Smith, the former head of Georgia's American Civil Liberties Union, are Osaf, Tomlinson and Amiko.

As of midnight on Wednesday, the AP said there could be more than a million votes in the Atlanta metro area, which so far dominates ASF.

Jon Ossoff was sharply criticized by Georgia's Secretary of State Brad Rafenspager after he promised to launch an investigation into the predominantly Democratic counties of Raffensperger DeCallab and Fulton after the election was delayed.

Fulton County surrounds the city of Atlanta. Parts of Atlanta are also in neighbouring Decalb County.

Georgia Republican State House Speaker David Ralston echoed similar sentiments and called for a committee in the state legislature to investigate.

“I have to say that I was particularly upset that our Secretary of State refused to take any personal responsibility for this frustration which was clear to anyone who saw it,” Asaf told reporters. "What happened yesterday was an outrage."

With clear leadership in the preliminary competition and a potential runoff, Osaf could have followed the same path three years ago.

In 2017, Jon Ossoff ran for the U.S. House in a special election to fill the seat in Georgia's 6th Congressional District.

He fell short of gaining a majority under the early spring 2 percentage points and lost to Republican Karen Handel at one point in the summer.

The district, located in the Atlanta metro area, has been GOP-controlled for nearly 40 years and became Democratic in 2018.

The 2013 special election has seen an increase in turnout for an off-year election and remains the most expensive house race ever recorded.

Although Asaf's national name recognition is high, he faced criticism during his early Senate campaign this year about starting his own life.

Jon Ossoff Off has led an organization that makes investigative documentaries and has previously been a congressional staffer, although he has never held an elected position.

Tomlinson, who cited his two terms as mayor and director of public security in his city, attacked his candidacy during a preliminary debate last month, and also cited a Republican survey that found Perdue before Jon Ossoff.

Georgia's 2020 state and congressional primaries will originally be held May 19, then postponed to June 9 due to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis.

In an interview with NPR in late April, the epidemic identified the campaign during the epidemic as a challenge but added that it was "comparable to what so many people are doing."

Georgia is the only state in the country with two Senate elections this year. In addition to the Perdue Race, a special election is planned in November to fill the seat of former GOP Sen. Johnny Isaacson, who has retired due to health challenges in the summer of 2011.

Republican Kelly Loffler was hired to fill the seat until the special election, and President Trump's ally Rep. Doug Collins has challenged him within his team.

The leading Democrat in the contest is Rev. Raphael Warnock, a senior pastor at Atlanta's historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. once preached.

After a significant turnout in the 2018 midterms, Georgia remains an important state for both Republicans and Democrats, and no Senate seat is considered safe for Republicans.

The Cook Political Report, a non-partisan organization that monitors state and federal elections, classifies both Senate elections as Republican-leaning races, a significant difference for a state that has not elected a Democrat in 20 years, rather than the prospect or strength of a Republican.

Assaf has received support from multiple Georgian leaders, including Rep. John Lewis, who supported him during his 2017 run.

If elected, Jon Ossoff, 33, is the youngest member of the U.S. Senate and the youngest to be elected since 1981, when former Sen. Don Nichols, R-Okla, took over.


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