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Reporter comments on the death of Marie Sophie Hingst

Marie Sophie Hingst

Marie Sophie Hingst:

Martin Doerry revealed that blogger Hingst had invented her Jewish family history. The "Spiegel" journalist defends the reporting.

In the current "Spiegel", reporter Martin Doerry commented on the research just a week after the death of blogger Marie Sophie Hingst, with whom he had transferred the 31-year-old as a liar at the end of May.

His "explanation" is titled "Mocking the Victims" and wants to explain why the "Spiegel" had to report the case of Marie Sophie Hingst.

Doerry writes that he is concerned about the young woman's death "day and night" and describes the history of his article published on June 1.

A rather random research team, including a historian, an ancestor researcher and a well-known German historian, would have disagreements discovered in Hingst's blog "Read on my dear" and

would have called the blogger in vain not to spread the story of her invented Jewish family history,
It was not until nothing helped that Doerry came into play.

 He writes that his text would not have appeared in the present form had Hingst announced a public correction of her lies - which she did not.

Martin Doerry
Martin Doerry 


Martin Doerry draws the picture of a woman who appeared "confident, determined and determined" and argued for her cause.

The Berlin correspondent of the Irish Times, Derek Scally, who first reported Hingst's death, found her confused and helpless after the revelations - and accused Doerry of overlooking Hingst's emotional state.

Doerry also records responses to Scally's report on social networks. He writes, "in many commentaries, her statement (Scally, ed.) That she felt herself" skinned alive "through the mirror, was seen as evidence of mental cruelty."

By contrast, Hingst's systematically spread lies about her supposedly Holocaust-killed ancestors for six years are often referred to as a venial sin or not at all.

"The legends of Ms Hingst, however, must be felt by all real Holocaust survivors and their families as a mockery of the victims," ​​explains Doerry.

In addition, these fictions delivered dangerous arguments to the Holocaust deniers. "It bothers me that you have to point that out again and again," writes Martin Doerry.

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