Why nobody wants to talk about David Crosby

David Crosby


David Crosby Documentary:

Crosby, Stills & Nash completed their last joint appearance four years ago at the Christmas Singing in front of the White House.

The trio performed there with the song "Silent Night", where nothing can go wrong, but on the dismayed face of Barack Obama was to be seen that he was aware of what was going on here.

The once so divine song together, in which the voices touched like silk handkerchiefs, was broken down into its fragments.

The performance was nothing less than the execution of perfect harmony, a public tripartite division.

"We did not really like each other," says David Crosby in the documentary "Remember My Name," which shows Arte in the run-up to the Woodstock jubilee.

They would have liked the songs that everyone brought along and that Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young raised to the status of a supergroup in the 70s.

A band made up of the names of their members, each of whom brought in an Olympic ego.

Unfortunately for David Crosby, this resulted in a larger-than-life egoism, as he estimates today.

 He was the one who, with his wickedness, insult and aloofness, repeatedly incriminated the fragile structure and destroyed it with his nasty remarks about Neil Young's new wife, Daryl Hannah, forever.

Graham Nash says bitterly, "He ripped CSNY's heart out."

David Crosby: Problematic personality

In A.J. Eaton's film, which was celebrated by the public this year at the Sundance Festival, not one of these rock star stories is told in which old men (yes, they are mostly old men) talk about old times.

Nobody wants to talk about David Crosby, that's significant. The statements of Neil Young and Graham Nash are twenty years old,

Stephen Stills is completely absent and Roger McGuinn, with whom Crosby founded The Byrds in 1964, is holding back noticeably.

The beauty of his singing (until today, which is a miracle at just under 78 years old) breaks down at Crosby with his character;

And so the film is not least an attempt to biographically explore his problematic personality and to give him back not always self-inflicted lost dignity.

In the evening of all days, a lonely man asks forgiveness. But of course, this is not a pure therapy session.

The film leaves David Crosby's career stations, with the SUV through LA, stopping at Laurel Canyon, in front of the house ("Our House")

where Crosby lived with Joni Mitchell, stopping at Kent State University, where four students were shot by National Guardsmen ("Ohio").

And he accompanies the seriously ill Crosby on a tour of which, as his wife always fears, he may never return.

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